Resources 2018-07-10T17:39:58+00:00

Resources

In seeking to understand, these resources may help you be better understood.

You have questions? We have answers. For those looking to better acquaint themselves with various immigration terms, types of visas, and resources that might help along the way, here’s a collection of links and FAQs that we think will be helpful to you:

Relevant Sources & Links

Government Web sites and resources to educate and guide

Just beginning your research into U.S. immigration? Looking for additional resources for help along the way? One or more of these sources may prove to be helpful on your journey.

Christoffersen Law is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

From visas to permanent residency, easy to understand answers to common questions we hear from our clients.

FAQs provide general information for reference. This website is not intended to provide legal advice and does not create an attorney-client relationship. We do not guarantee it to be complete, accurate, and up-to-date. Please always seek the advice of legal counsel before taking any action.

Visas

A visa is a permit to apply for entry into the United States (U.S.). Visas are different from “status,” which pertains to the amount of time the individual is permitted to stay in the U.S. after admission. Nonimmigrant and immigrant are the two basic types of visas: nonimmigrant is issued to individuals who plan to stay with a specific purpose and for a temporary period of time; the immigrant visa is for individuals who plan to live and work indefinitely in the U.S.

If an individual is traveling to the U.S., they (and family members) should apply for a nonimmigrant visa at the nearest U.S. embassy or consular post. Before applying for the visa, applicants must obtain the required documentation and may include approval of a nonimmigrant visa petition by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). However, obtaining a valid visa does not guarantee entry. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has admission authority and may ultimately grant or deny entry in addition to determining how long an individual may stay in the U.S.

If you are from a country that is not part of the visa waiver program, you will need a visa issued by a US consulate abroad. B visa authorization is utilized for temporary visits to the United States, including meetings and seminars. It does not provide work authorization in the US.

If you are from a country that is not part of the visa waiver program, you will need a visa issued by a US consulate abroad. B visa authorization is utilized for temporary visits to the United States, including meetings and seminars. It does not provide work authorization in the US.

Each consulate has its own procedures so please refer to the US Department of State for information specific to your home consulate. An application form, fee payment, and electronic photograph are typically required before making an appointment.

I-94

An I-94 is an Arrival/Departure record that is typically granted on admission to the United States. A visitor must exit the U.S. prior to the expiration of the I-94 record or face potential penalties, which can be quite significant. Note that it is the I-94 that controls the length of stay, not the date on the visa, which is a travel document. Visitors should be sure to check the expiration of the I-94 on each entry into the United States and correct any errors immediately. CBP has automated the I-94 system at sea and air ports of entry while I-94 cards are issued at land ports of entry. For access to the automated/electronic I-94 record, please see https://i94.cbp.dhs.gov.

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